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t1dactiveliving.

Creating this was only a few years ago, but it feels like a lifetime.

Writing hasn’t been easy.

Being vulnerable with your most intimate thoughts and feelings is hard. Incredibly hard at times.

I’ve been enjoying the “break” but I’m by no means leaving as a source of support.

 

The past while I’ve really been reflecting on what t1dactiveliving means. And what I want at the end of the day, is to help people, even if it’s just one person. So I’m planning something new, a different medium of connecting, in the hopes that others won’t feel as alone, confused and scared as I was.

That’s it for now. I hope you are all doing well.

 

 

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Review: 7 day Dexcom continuous glucose monitor trial

7 days with the Dexcom condensed into a 15 second video.

Read about Day 1 with the Dexcom here Knowledge= freedom. This past week I made several discoveries, the most major being that in between midnight and 4 a.m., my blood glucose levels go LL Cool J on me. Dawn phenomenon= blood glucose spikes at the end of the night. After 4 a.m. things go back to “normal” and I wake up around 6-8 mmol/l (108-144 mg/dl). The rest of the nights brought similar results, although not as drastic. I would have NEVER KNOWN about this without a CGM.  How long has this been going on? Will I feel better when I eliminate night-time spikes? Is it finally long-lasting insulin time? Is my pump shopping going to become a reality soon? The week-long trial has sparked a lot of questions. I’m going to my endo armed with all the data I’ve collected. For the week I managed to get in running, yoga, NTC fit workouts and ballet. I couldn’t bring myself to try swimming as my goggles got stolen a few weeks ago and I wouldn’t be able to swim knowing someone could snag Dex.

My workout lows dramatically decreased and I believe that’s because I could see when I was heading south and could correct before things got bad. Whether it was thrift shopping, studying or eating out, Dex and I were inseparable.

And with the pretty graph as proof, I confirmed that brown rice sushi is heaven-sent. Check out Shawn Shepheard and I’s sweet bg’s post-Japanese chow down. Exact same #’s too!     Have to admit I was sad to lose Dex on Sunday. But I’m so grateful. So grateful for the trial. So grateful for the knowledge I gained during the week. Now it’s time to meet with my health team and find out what’s best. J © t1dactiveliving.com All rights reserved.

Photo Essay: Spare a Rose, Save a Child (Life for a Child Program)

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How many of us stare at our meter, then cringe and complain at our blood glucose reading?

We feel our hard fingertips and needle stings, grunt at error messages and faulty sites.

Although our frustrations shouldn’t be dismissed, they are definitely #firstworldproblems. Many in developing countries don’t have access to insulin, meters, strips or even doctors.

You can make a difference for someone living with diabetes. The difference between life and death.

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This Valentine’s Day, consider donating to the International Diabetes Federation Life for a Child program. Spare a rose in your bouquet on love day and give hope to a child who needs it.

See the faces of those you are helping.

A full list of blogs and sites helping to promote Spare A Rose, Save a Child via Kerri Sparling’s Six Until Me

Sending love to diabetic children and their families around the world,

J

Toronto ice storm diabetes photo art

Taken this morning around my neighbourhood.

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This post was inspired by fellow type 1 diabetic Scully. Her December 12 of 12-tiny things photo entry featured one unit of insulin as the focus, and it was amazing to see visually just how tiny a drop of insulin is.

Hope everyone is staying safe. Happy holidays,

Jessie

My first time pump shopping: Animas & OmniPod

Current insulin: 1U of Humalog for every 20gr of carbs (No Lantus) via pen

My endocrinologist said I won’t have much use for a pump right now because I’m not on any long-lasting insulin. However, I’ve been slowly trying to wrap my brain around the world of insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitoring devices (CGM’s).

It was a very overwhelming morning. I was in the hospital from 9-11:30 a.m. and by the time I got out, I was toast. I love my endocrinologist as well as my diabetes team, so I do count myself lucky, however sometimes the process is draining (another post soon on what happened at the endo yesterday).

So first thought: don’t cram a whole bunch of diabetes-related events into one day. I had my hospital visit all morning and then booked my pump meeting in the afternoon. Spread it out.

Background: I have researched pumps online for the past half year or so. If you’re interested in pumps, call/e-mail the various companies (even if you don’t feel you like a particular type of pump) and set up a meeting. Write down every question ahead of time. Ask for demo ones to try out. Then ask for more.

It’s a big commitment. For me in Ontario, it’s 5 years (through government funding). So I better choose wisely.

The companies I have and will set up meetings with here in Ontario are: OmniPod, Animas, Metronic &  Accuchek. Am I missing any?

In August I met a rep from OmniPod and yesterday, I met up with the folks at Animas.

I don’t know when the time will come when I will be eligible for a pump, but I’m pretty sure that I will probably get one to try it out either way. That being said I don’t take issue with the multiple injections. In 95% of instances, I inject with my pen in public without even thinking about it.

It took me a while to get to this point mind you, but now I am pretty comfortable with it.

So if that’s not a problem, why even think about a pump? Why have something attached to you?

I’m all about experimentation. I think when it comes to my diabetes care, I want to try out all the technology that’s available to me. If it gives me better control, I am all for it. I also really respect those who choose not to pump. To each their own! Whatever works for you and you are most comfortable I say.

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Here’s what I learned (and please feel free to correct me if I’ve got it wrong):

  • the pump slowly gives out insulin through the tubing (or pod) every few minutes (I thought it was every hour)
  • you can suspend the dosage at any time
  • pumps can calculate insulin stacking (measuring all the insulin in your body)

Thoughts on wireless vs. tubing: 

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The picture above is of the old Omnipod. Apparently the new ones are 30 per cent smaller. I asked for 10 demo pods after my meeting with Lucy in August. Since I’m highly active, I wanted to bang them up as much as possible. I took baths, I ran, swam, rode. They felt fine, but I have nothing to compare it to.

In my pump shopping venture I have learned the following and hope this helps you when you decide to pump shop:

  • learning about pumps can be overwhelming. Give yourself ample time. Start early. Yes, by the time you get a pump the technology may be different, but it’s best to start now and slowly build your knowledge base
  • don’t be afraid to ask lots of questions and follow up with reps with more questions after your meeting
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  • take reviews with a grain of salt. People are quick to complain and as we all know, being online is where people come to vent. Look at who is writing the review. Do they have any credibility?

Do you have any cool links about pumps in Canada or in general? I’m looking to build a resource page and if you see something good out there in the online universe, send it my way!

Jessica