Let the month of diabetes awareness begin!

If ever there is a time to get out there and connect with fellow t1d’s, it’s this month. There are loads of events happening in Toronto (and across Canada of course) and I wanted to share with you some of them so you can book those days off and meet up with your friends who just ‘get it’.

The earliest event is coming up on Wednesday:

I’ve interviewed both Michelle and Sebastian and trust that this talk will leave you feeling so much better about your diabetes management.

Call Calgary home? Why not mix and mingle with Connected in Motion?

Their next event is on Nov. 4th. Click here for more details! 

Sports your thang? Check out this event. Toronto Argos dress in blue too. #twinsies

And on World Diabetes Day, Nov. 14th, the annual Type 1 Update hosted by Animas will take place once again!

I go to this event every year (I went in the spring) and I think this may be the first one I miss which makes me really sad. I’ll be sure to cover the event in whatever way I can though. This 1/2 day has always lifted my spirits and made me feel more confident. I hope you can attend this one! Don’t forget to RSVP to Robin.
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There’s so many more events but here are the highlights. Feel free to comment and share any other events that you know of this going on this month.

And one more thing! What’s an awareness month without some profile pic changes? Check out this awesome campaign #T1DLooksLikeMe and get yours here.

XO

Jess

Yee haw! Connected in Motion goes country with Humber College

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I’m definitely not country, but yesterday I was line dancing.

Serious.

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It was called Country in Motion, a fundraiser for Connected in Motion (get it? Clever.) Organized by Humber’s post-graduate event management program students. Must say everyone I encountered at the various games and silent auction were really enthusiastic.

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I ring-tossed, took photos with my fellow t1 ladies in the photo-booth, bid for yoga gear at the silent auction…

…and watched as people tried to tackle the mechanical bull…like this cowgirl. Eeeek.

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The BEST part was getting to spend time with two t1 athletes- spin instructor Stephanie and Ironman-in-training Anne Marie. It’s always so fun to be around other people who ‘just get it’. We laughed, yelled loudly to each other over the country music and planned our future bike rides together.

Last year Steph both did the MS two-day bike ride and didn’t even know it! Better planning will happen this year for a meet up 😀

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IMG_0393The highlight of my night was listening to Steph speak to the audience about her experience being an active type 1.

Totally inspiring and as she said, when we all get together, “Everyone has something different to bring to the table”.

 

 

So I was a little out of my element in a saloon, but totally at home with my t1 fitness girls.

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Xo

Jess

Stephanie Brodie- Toronto’s queen type 1 fitness instructor

Ever meet someone who motivates and inspires you and he or she doesn’t even know it?

Meet Stephanie Brodie.

She was one of them for me-a person who by the simple act of sharing her athletic life with type 1 diabetes, helped me live mine to the fullest.

Stephanie is a fitness instructor, certified RPM spin instructor, half-marathoner and Connected in Motion ambassador.

Thank you Stephanie for sharing this inspirational quote!

XO,

J

50 sec video: Connected in Motion’s Skate Night

Am I going back in time to the roaring 20’s? Yes, yes I am. Enjoy the video.

Location: Nathan Phillips Square, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Hot food never tasted so good! It was pretty cold out yesterday but a bunch of us type 1’s laced up and skated through the night. Lots of laughs, lots of fun-always the way with Connected in Motion!

XOXO,

J

Now what? After the big race…

I’ve been singing Disney songs ever since my race. Aladdin. Little Mermaid. You name it, I’m singing it….poorly mind you but with big hand gestures and sometimes twirling.

Okay, a lot of twirling. But hey, I’m celebrating right?

Realizations? I love the long run. I prefer half-marathon distances to 5 and 10 km races.

Another marathon? I think that’s very likely.

For living well with type 1, for life in general. Here’s your Monday Motivation:

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IMG_0094Bummed to have missed Connected in Motion‘s Slipstream this year so sent some active vibes their way during my workout yesterday.

XO

J

 

What a difference a year makes: Connected in Motion’s Trampoline Dodgeball Tournament 2014

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Last year I showed up to Connected in Motion’s trampoline dodgeball tournament scared and alone.

It was my first active event with CIM and I was beyond nervous. You can read my blog on that day here.

This time around was so different. It was a chance to see my amazing friends, but it was also a reminder of what a difference a year makes.

So many CIM events in between and friendships made and grown. More acceptance. More empowerment. More strength. Without Connected in Motion, I really don’t know where I’d be in this journey. I cannot thank you guys enough-from the people who run the show to the volunteers and all its members.

Special thank you to Amy & Steph-dodgeball organizers 🙂

Here are the photos from this weekend’s tournament-another one in the books!

 

 

Opinion: Being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes as an adult

My diagnosis smoothie is a not-so-healthy mix of guilt, frustration and…wait for it..an additional hit of more guilt.

At the last JDRF adult support group meeting I attended we got into the topic of what it’s like to be diagnosed as an adult. I was pointed out by one of the organization’s reps as someone who was diagnosed much later in life (29).

I was happy to share my thoughts on the issue, but more importantly, incredibly thrilled that someone else in the room was able to chime in with me in feeling the same.

JDRF in the exhibit hall.

JDRF in the exhibit hall.

Guilt: I haven’t lived with type 1 diabetes for very long. I’ve passed my two year mark but that’s it. The majority of t1d’s were diagnosed so much earlier in life. What right do I have to complain when I lived such a huge portion of my life free from the worries this disease brings?

I’m hyper aware of this fact and so when I’m around other type 1’s or even people who are curious about what it’s like to live with t1d, I watch myself carefully. I don’t ever want others to feel like I’m not acknowledging their long struggle with this autoimmune disease.

I’ve been through my fair share of struggle, heartache and pain. This did not happen to me at a time when I was still growing. Why can’t I get this down? Why do I feel so incredibly helpless at times? I have often felt guilty for feeling this way, not for myself, but for the loved ones around me who feel the ripples of t1d.

Frustration: Trying to explain t1d and that I was diagnosed at 29 can be a pain. As an adult, coupled with the misconceptions about the disease, I feel (FEEL, not that it’s in any way reality) like there is a judgement put on me when I proclaim I am diabetic.

“She must not have taken care of herself.”

For me- I equate the above statement with being lazy about my health. I know that’s not the case, but for some reason I cringe to even think that the word ‘lazy’ can be associated with me. I’m a self-confessed workaholic (but I’m getting better). Prior to being diagnosed I was the girl who stayed late at the office and checked her e-mails in the middle of the night. It has been incredibly difficult to own my disease because of my Type A, work-work-work mentality I have carried with me for many years.

A little more guilt: I know there are people in this world praying for food, water, the end to violence. I live in a place where I have access to insulin, doctors and amazing organizations like Connected in Motion. In the grand scheme of things, I know I have it good. I am free to live how I want, pursue my dreams and have the hope of a long life ahead of me. There’s a tinge of guilt for me when t1d gets me down and I complain or make note of my annoyance.

I left that meeting feeling a lot better about being diagnosed much later in life. I always knew it, but this time I felt it- I was not alone in my thoughts and emotions.

Irregardless of what struggle you face (a disease, a troubled relationship, a career dilemma) it always feels good to know you don’t walk the path solo. Others have prevailed and so will you.