Confessions on World Diabetes Day #WDD

google-insulin

I’m not going to search “cure for diabetes”, because in all likelihood, I’m going to get results such as tea from Asia, a pill from a company with no address or some type of scary diet that involves me only eating with my left hand and on Tuesdays.

I don’t live day by day hoping for a cure. A cure doesn’t even cross my mind as something feasible. Maybe that’s the pessimist in me but I really live like there will never be a cure.

Maybe that’s a blessing and a curse all rolled into one.

Now, four years later since my diagnosis, I am sure of a few things that I never thought I would be.

  1. Whatever you think is bad, could be much worse.

Diabetes puts things into perspective. Fast. To say that I hit my anxiety and depression bottom at the time of my diagnosis would be a huge understatement. Although it was a burning, incredibly painful, dark time, I have come to realize that things could have been much, much worse.

I am alive. I have access to insulin. I am not in danger of being killed for having a disease. I try to think of this as much as I can. Things can always be worse.

2. It is up to us to help break the barrier when it comes to talking about mental health.

I’m surprised at how little support there is when it comes to mental health and diabetes. It’s certainly something I had to fight for in my own health journey. We have to raise our voices and create, demand and advocate for more resources. So many suffer in silence, and we are at a pivotal time where we can help bring this issue to light.

3. We all want self-acceptance. We all want to feel unconditional love. Diabetes and any other autoimmune disease can make this process 100 x more difficult. For me, it’s been such a treacherous road. And I’m not sure what lies ahead. All I know is, I am so incredibly thankful for the people I’ve met through my diabetes journey. I couldn’t imagine life without them. So to you, you know who you are…thank you. You guys have pulled me out of storms and I hope to spend my life providing you the same type of love and encouragement that you’ve shown me.

world-diabetes-day

Happy World Diabetes Day,

Jess

 

 

 

Advertisements

Diabetes Defense

myabetic

Does this ever go away: When people speak about diabetes, I automatically get my back up. Is what you’re saying true? Do you even know what you are talking about?!

The fact is, I don’t know everything there is to know, and for someone who has lived with this disease for 4 years, my knowledge is pretty limited I’m sure.

If I flip the switch, I’m sure there are tons of instances where I have spoken about a medical condition or any topic for that matter-and in silence, maybe someone cringed at my ignorance.

So how can I feel better and more comfortable when the topic of diabetes comes up?