DSMA Blue Fridays- the dress with all the detail

I hit the jackpot with this dress. Sequence, beading, more beading, gold? Oh my!

I show you guys an outfit at the end of each week for Blue Fridays.

Sport any kind of blue on…well…Fridays to show your support for those affected by diabetes.

 

Show me your blue outfit pics, hashtag it #BlueFridays and share!

Happy Friday,

Jess

150km + with type 1 diabetes. The MS Bike Tour from London to Grand Bend wrap-up

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“Nice behind. Hey I can say that without getting into trouble!”

I heard that more than once with my fake and dimply plastic butt attached to well… my real butt.

Team name: Butt Ugly (get it?)

Event: MS Bike Tour from Grand Bend to London, Ontario, Canada  (in support of Multiple Sclerosis)

Distance: around 160 km total. 85 km on day 1, 75km on day 2.

Accentuating the positives

  • Learned more about MS, how it changes people’s lives and why it’s such a worthy cause to support.
  • Re-discovered that my parent’s friend lives with MS. Although I cannot remember what she looks like, I thought of her often during the ride and it pushed me through some tough spots.
  • Successfully completed the tour feeling happy & confident.
  • No lows (for me this is a big deal as I’ve been battling lows while training for a while).
  • Somehow I managed to stay in between 4-8ish (mmol) for the entire two days. This is in large part due to the well-spaced rest stops which provided ample food & drinks of all sorts. At almost every stop I filled up on Gatorade to sip slowly as I rode, ate PB & J sandwiches and wraps.
  • Hydration win. I drank ample water and other liquids. When the weather isn’t super sunny I find it easy to slip on continually rehydrating. This time around I really made it a priority and it helped.

Lessons learned & other notes

  • Train. This season has been severely disorganized and 100 per cent my fault. Next year I will be more prepared, and will do back to back training rides so I’ll be in better form. I did one 100km bike ride (my longest distance prior to event day) and that was about it. Definitely not enough.
  • Test often. Each day I tested about 15-20 times. I’m glad I poked as much as I did because my bg’s would have been very low had I not remedied the situation.
  • Near bedtime I was around 4mmol so I drank an entire can of pop (not recommended) and I ended up floating around 6 or 7. It was a really weird experience and it made me realize just how badly my bg’s dip when doing long distance.

And the most important victory…

I tested my bg’s while riding! Last year I kept trying and with no success. I would either fall, the test strip would fly somewhere or my meter would be on the road.

While riding with my friend I told her, “I’m going to try, I’m determined to do this.” With a little sweat I pulled it off and we celebrated together. It’s amazing to have such supportive friends.

After day 2 of the ride I still lowered my insulin levels by about 50% but by the day after that, I was back to normal.

Here’s what one of our teammates did to her bike. She arrived before us and we found her bike sound asleep by the time we got in.

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A big congrats to fellow t1d athlete Stephanie Brodie who also took part in the event! I had no idea she was there until after the fact. There’s also a great Connected in Motion indoor spin event that will be led by Stephanie, a certified RPM instructor.

It’s good to be back and if you have any other questions don’t hesitate to ask.

J