5 lessons I learned from the JDRF infosium in Toronto

photo 5-21. Listen to your body and trust your instincts. 

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Beauty and the Beast actor and guest speaker Austin Basis was extremely active growing up.

He played basketball, baseball and hockey. He wanted to be an MLB player.

Sports taught him to always be prepared and to learn and acknowledge the signs his body gave him.

2. The bionic pancreas is giving people hope.

Dr. Steven Russell had the audience in applause after this slide:

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The closed-loop artificial pancreas blood glucose control system continuously monitors blood glucose levels. Fast-acting insulin and glucagon gets delivered based on a computer algorithm.

So, no more carb counting or guessing what stress and exercise would do to your bg’s. This device does all the work. Russell said the ambitious date of release to the public is 2017. Find out more here.

Click on any photo and browse

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 3. It’s 100 per cent okay to acknowledge how difficult diabetes is. 

Closing speaker Joe Solowiejczyk is a nurse, diabetes educator and family therapist. He’s been living with type 1 diabetes for over 50 years.

I’ve heard Joe speak before and although I’ve heard his sentiments before, it was so nice to hear them again.

Diabetes sucks. It’s like a full-time job. Yes Joe!

My favourite quote of the night by Joe was this, “I am exhausted. I hate having diabetes. I love being alive.”

We are all troopers and need to remember that.

4. People will be ignorant. Rise above it. 

I used to get mad. Very mad. Steaming mad really when I saw a joke about diabetes or when people assumed I didn’t take care of myself or ate too much sugar. The rage I felt was downright scary, and it would quickly spiral into moments of deep sadness and frustration.

Joe made a great point about those who are ignorant towards type 1 diabetes.

Can you say that you have NEVER made a comment that might have shown ignorance about a medical condition?

What do YOU know about other health conditions? Some people are ignorant. Others are just stupid.

Not knowing about type 1 diabetes hurts because it’s personal.

Brush it off. Educate if you want (I try to!). Focus on the positives and spend your time with people who do the same. This has been one of the greatest lessons I’ve learned from t1d.

5. Over-estimate the demand for diet pop. Here’s what was left at the end of the night.

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Connect.

Check out all the tweets from the event via Connected in Motion’s Storify

Austin Basis | Website | Twitter | Facebook |

Joe Solowiejczyk | Website | LinkedIn |

Dr. Russell Stevens | Bionic Pancreas |

JDRF Canada Infosiums

JDRF Canada | Website | Facebook | Twitter |

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2 Comments

    1. Thanks for commenting Jennifer. I can totally relate to the feeling of not wanting to be a complainer, but then also wanting acknowledgement of just how hard it can be. Here we get each other 🙂

      Reply

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