Terrence Teixeira: Canadian triathlete, adventure-seeker and all round type 1 super star

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Terrence’s adventures around the world. In no particular order. 

“Do you know Terrence Teixeira?”

I’ve had a handful of people ask me that question the past few months.

I understand why.

We both have a passion for fitness and were both diagnosed as adults within the last two years.

During the Animas Type 1 Diabetes Update at Mount Sinai Hospital this weekend, I finally met the double T (I just made that up. Do people already call him this? Verdict unknown on whether he will think that is funny or lame. Will update later.)

He was the last speaker of the day and had me in stitches.

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Terrence is one of those people that just make you feel happy. I didn’t spend much time chatting with him but I believe in that statement.

As he talked about his diagnosis, it became apparent that from the very start, he BELIEVED and knew diabetes wouldn’t stop him from anything he wanted to achieve.

He climbed Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest free standing mountain in the world in 2012. And what did he do when he got to the top? Snap a shot of his bg’s of course! This pic makes me happy.

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Terrence shared with the crowd many sentiments that I also believe. Living with type 1 diabetes gives you mental focus. It makes you a better athlete because you’re more aware of your body.

“Diabetes doesn’t prevent you from doing anything.”

Here are 5 things the triathlete, marathoner and all-round athlete shared:

Master the transition. For those who don’t know, a triathlon is a race where you 1. swim 2. bike 3. run. The transition in between these activities is considered the fourth sport.

Terrence says diabetes is a bit of the same as that triathlon transition or fourth sport. Managing your diabetes is what you are doing in between (testing your bg’s, giving insulin, making adjustments) but incredibly important for you to reach your goal.

Knowledge is power. “In a race you need to know all the twists and turns.” Terrence told us he went on a pump just three weeks ago and is learning this new way of delivering insulin.

Become educated. Life with diabetes can’t be perfect but he says we can arm ourselves with more information to help us navigate through the race.

Expect the unexpected. Strive for excellence. Change your attitude. It’s all about how you approach things.

Teamwork. Gather support from those around you. Like me, Terrence points to Connected in Motion as part of his support team. Ask questions from others and help each other.

Setting priorities. We all have the same 24 hours in a day. Set your own priorities. You choose what you want to do every day.

“Everyone has their own marathon to run.”

Thanks for sharing your story Terrence. Another example of a Canadian athlete smashing personal records and going for gold with type 1 diabetes.

Visit Terrence’s website here.

J

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