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Fasting BGs, Can You Not

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I feel like my body is just one giant experiment for diabetes health professionals.

No one can say 100% which type of diabetes I have, and I really have to get used to that fact that I will probably never know. The circumstances around my diagnosis and what has happened after make stamping me a particular type unlikely.

My bg’s now are creeping up in the morning, running higher than I’ve ever seen during the day-and now I’m angry. And frustrated.

The current Lantus dose seems to be not doing much, and any oral medication I’ve tried has not helped me at all.

Let go. Let go. Let go of trying to control the uncontrollable. Sounds odd for someone to say who lives with diabetes, but I think that’s what I need.

 

 

 

I hate exercise. How to combat the workout blues.

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By now we all know that exercise is good for us. I feel so lucky that I LOVE to exercise. Not like…but LOVE.

But what if you don’t? What if getting out and moving is torturous?

Here are some suggestions that I hope might help.

  • If you love movies or television, hit the gym with your Netflix app in hand. Catching up on your shows while getting a good sweat is a win-win. I find this helps pass the time a lot easier.
  • Commute it. Thinking of exercise as one big chunk of time can be intimidating and daunting. Building exercise into you commute can help. Park at the back of the parking lot, get off one stop early and walk, all these steps will add up.
  • Find a buddy. We know the stats. Accountability is King (or Queen, or whatever you want it to be). Knowing someone is there, relying on you to show up can make all the difference. You can catch up and bond too.
  • Don’t do what you don’t like. If you absolutely hate the vibe of a gym, don’t go. This year I’ve really gotten back to basics and I asked myself the question, “What did I love to do when I was young?” That was swimming, dancing, cycling…so that’s what I’ve predominately chosen this year as my main source of activity and it’s much more fulfilling.

Have any other tips? Feel free to share!

J

Let’s play make believe. #bluefridays

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Did someone say it was time to post a fairy tale outfit for #BlueFridays ?

Check this one out.

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I love these huge, immaculate dresses. Close your eyes and go back in time-through the forest of course!

We wear blue on Fridays to support those with diabetes. Check out the official Facebook page here. If you wear blue, we wanna see you! Hashtag on social media #BlueFridays and show us what you got.

I would love to wear this for a day.

Happy Friday all!

 

Diabetes Poetry

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I had so much fun making up lyrics to Adele’s Hello a while back.

It got me thinking, is there any diabetes poetry out there? Luckily I found some winners from Insulin Nation’s type 1 diabetes poetry contest. Check it out here!

Here’s my shot at rhyming:

A tightrope walk where I know I’ll slip

A prick, a test and a bg dip

Don’t let the invisibility lie to the images you see

It’s a challenging, draining and warrior-making life

It’s type 1 diabetes

 

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Drip Drip Drip. Sweat Does The Body Good

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So this is my sweat. It may be gross to some, smelly to others, but to me, it’s beautiful. It’s hard earned drops of glory.

Sweating means I’m putting in effort. I’m in it. My body is moving.

When I’m stressed, anxious or depressed, dripping from head to toe can often be my saving grace.

It apparently helps rid the body of toxins, makes your skin better and prevents colds and infections. That’s according to this article right here.

I don’t doubt the benefits of sweat and hope the next time you see a dampened shirt in the mirror, you smile.

J

 

 

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Emotional Burnout. Canadian Diabetes Association Webinar

Not sure about you, but I often roll my eyes when I read or hear about diabetes and mental health statistics.

Oh people with diabetes are more likely to suffer from anxiety and depression? Wow.

If you’ve dealt with diabetes for more than a day, you would well know how difficult it can be to continually walk on the tight and often unbalanced rope we’ll call d-management.

 

A photo posted by Jess (@t1dactiveliving) on May 29, 2016 at 7:59am PDT

 

The main message that I took from the webinar was this: be kind to yourself.

I am so quick to judge myself with harsh words for not catching a low or a mini self-beatdown for trending high.

How can I be kind to myself? How does this work?

A photo posted by Jess (@t1dactiveliving) on Mar 22, 2016 at 8:07pm PDT

 

Here’s what I’ve been trying to do to keep my mental health afloat.

  • I go offline. I’ve really come to realize how detrimental being online all the time can be. A little shut down for some good ol’ fashion reading, a nice bubble bath or play time with pets goes a long way.
  • Dedicate self-care time. This sounds silly but I do make a to-do list of things to ensure that I get it done. Mine includes yoga, meditation, and 5 minutes of de-cluttering

If you have any ideas, let me know!

Sending you all a bit of kindness and of course, smooth bg’s.

J